Abstract Painting

Posted by lindacelestian on January 4, 2016 in All Posts, Blog, Painting, Workshops

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I’ll be teaching another Abstract Painting Workshop at Highlands Art Garage on February 7th, 1-4 pm. The focus of the first workshop was Color this upcoming one will focus on mark-making. Mark-making is something you hear a lot about but might not truly understand how important it is in an abstract painting. Abstract means without representation. So if you’re not describing something like a sunset or a flower petal with your brushstrokes then what are you supposed to be doing with the paint? Abstract art has the ability to communicate at a deeper level than a representation painting can. It can make a person feel something that is universal and may not even be able to be described by words alone. That’s the power of abstract art.

The workshop participants will explore lots of mark making tools and techniques to learn a vocabulary of marks. Each kind of mark can describe and communicate different ideas and moods. Large brushes make different marks than small brushes do. You can paint with palette knives that come in different sizes. Paint companies make different texturing tools that can be used different ways. You can find lots of unconventional tools at the hardware or dollar store.  You can pour the paint like I do. Combining certain materials create natural occurring marks, like dripping turpenoid into wet acrylic paint. It’s important to explore these things to develop a language to express yourself. It’s similar to a toddler learning language.

 

SpatulaIMG_4707

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Drips and SplattersIMG_4701

Marks from printing
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Poured PaintIMG_4699

Sponge BrushIMG_4693

Hair Pick and BrushIMG_4694

Squeegee IMG_4695

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PrintingIMG_4692

You can find lots of unconventional tools at the hardware or dollar store also. Last workshop we explored the marks that occur from printing. You can pour the paint like I do. Combining certain materials create natural occurring marks, like dripping turpenoid into wet acrylic paint. It’s important to explore these things to develop a language to express yourself. It’s similar to a toddler learning language. They get frustrated less as they gain more language skills and learn how to ask for exactly what they want. In the workshop we will work on painted papers that can be used to collage with when learning about composition which will be the next Abstract Painting workshop on March 6th. If you’re interested in joining in on this journey of discovery register at Highlands Art Garage, Wilmington, DE.

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